Web Archiving Roundup: February 2017

A few quick links on web archiving topics

Weekly web archiving roundup: September 18, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of September 18, 2015:

Weekly web archiving roundup: September 10, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of September 10, 2015:

Weekly web archiving roundup: August 14, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of August 14, 2015:

Weekly web archiving roundup: July 24, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of July 24, 2015:

Weekly web archiving roundup: July 16, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of July 16, 2015:

Weekly web archiving roundup: July 8, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of July 8, 2015:

  • Digital Underground“, by Ann Powers. Who Will Make Sure The Internet’s Vast Musical Archive Doesn’t Disappear?
  • The Web Will Either Kill Science Journals or Save Them“, by Julia Greenberg.  In a study published last week, Vincent Larivière, along with his co-authors Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, found that in the natural and medical sciences as well as the social sciences and humanities, five major publishers “account for more than 50 percent of all papers published in 2013.” Those publishers include Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, and Taylor & Francis. (The fifth differs for the two major fields—American Chemical Society for the hard sciences, Sage Publications for the more social ones.)
  • Does the rise of ephemeral content spell the death of archives?“, by Melody Kramer. As news sites negotiate with Facebook to publish material directly on the platform, Facebook’s role in determining what news to surface, what news to censor, and how original content published on the platform is archived should be examined more closely.

Weekly web archiving roundup: June 24, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of June 24, 2015:

  • A New Interface and New Web Archive Content at Loc.gov“, by Abbie Grotke. Recently the Library of Congress launched a significant amount of new Web Archive content on the Library’s Web site, as a part of a continued effort to integrate the Library’s Web Archives into the rest of the loc.gov web presence.
  • Dodge that Memory Hole: Saving Digital News“, by Abbey Potter. Newspapers are some of the most-used collections at libraries. Networked digital technologies have changed how we communicate with each other and have rapidly changed how information is disseminated. These changes have had a drastic effect in the news industry, disrupting delivery mechanisms, upending business models and dispersing  resources across the world wide web.
  • The Archive Is Closed“, by Scott McLemee.  Update on the Twitter archive at the Library of Congress.
  • Data is immortal, but not immune to decay“, by Martin Doyle. Data exists in a dangerous state of near-non existence. Few businesses would risk not having backups in place. With cloud computing becoming commonplace in enterprise, we’ve come to accept that our data will be replicated and stored in duplicate.
  • Facing the Challenge of Web Archives Preservation Collaboratively: The Role and Work of the IIPC Preservation Working Group“, by IIPC Preservation Working Group – DLib Mag. DLib Magazine article on the goals and activities of the IIPC Preservation Working Group (PWG), including as a survey about the current state of preservation in member web archives and a number of collaborative projects which the Preservation Working Group is developing. These resources are designed to help address the preservation and long-term access to the web by sharing ideas and experiences, and by building up databases of information for support of preservation strategies and actions.

Weekly web archiving roundup: June 4, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of June 4, 2015:

  • School Board Meetings to Go Live“, by Rita Robinson. The Laguna Beach Unified School District board voted 3-1 Tuesday to stream public meetings online. The board approved $50,000 for equipment and technology for live-stream-webcasting and archiving school board meetings on the district’s website.
  • Are You Doing Enough to Prevent Link Rot?“, by Ernie Smith. Organizations and universities alike have been banding together to prevent important-yet-dated documents from disappearing entirely online.
  • How Broken Hyperlinks Are Screwing Up Science“, by Chris Mills. For most of us, a hyperlink 404ing is a problem fixable with a quick visit to the Wayback Machine (or maybe just taking a walk away from the computer and reflecting on the importance of cat GIFs). But for academics, broken links present a more serious issue.

 

 

Weekly web archiving roundup: May 28, 2015

Weekly web archiving roundup for the week of May 28, 2015:

  • A New Interface and New Web Archive Content at Loc.gov“, by Abbie Grotke. Recently the Library of Congress launched a significant amount of new Web Archive content on the Library’s Web site, as a part of a continued effort to integrate the Library’s Web Archives into the rest of the loc.gov web presence.
  • The K-12 Web Archiving Program: Preserving the Web from a Youthful Point of View“, by Butch Lazorchak and Cheryl Lederle. If you believe the Web (and who doesn’t believe everything they read on the Web?), it boastfully celebrated its 25th birthday last year. Twenty-five years is long enough for the first “children of the Web” to be fully-grown adults, just now coming of age to recognize that the Web that grew up around them has irrevocably changed.
  • The race to preserve disappearing data“, by Bina Venkataraman. Vint Cerf, a founding father of the Internet, warned at a recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science that our era is in danger of becoming a “digital dark age,” from which we’ll leave our progeny too little information to grasp their history. But who is responsible for bearing the cost of preserving digital artifacts and knowledge for the future? And how do we determine what’s worth saving?