Web Archiving Roundup: December 11, 2017

Happy December, Roundtablers! Here’s your Web Archiving Roundup for December 11, 2017:

  • Sustaining the Software that Preserves Access to Web Archives: on Digital Preservation Day, Andrew Jackson took a look at open source tools that enable access to web archives, and asked us to think about what comes next.
  • Speaking of moving forward — how do you move a web archive? On their blog, the National Archives details what went into moving 120 terabytes of data, on seventy drives, from Internet Memory Research’s data centre in Paris, to the Archives site in Kew, and, finally, to the Cloud. (Archived link.)
  • For the Digital Preservation Coalition, David S. H. Rosenthal writes about how we might be Losing the Battle to Archive the Web.
  • And, at the Atlantic, Alexis C. Madrigal writes that Future Historians Probably Won’t Understand Our Internet, and That’s Okay. Today, he notes: ‘there is more data about more people than ever before, however, the cultural institutions dedicated to preserving the memory of what it was to be alive in our time, including our hours on the internet, may actually be capturing less usable information than in previous eras.’ Still, as Nick Seaver says, ‘Is it terrible that not everything that happens right now will be remembered forever? Yeah, that’s crappy, but it’s historically quite the norm.’ (Archived link.)
  • Web Archiving Histories and Futures: the International Internet Preservation Consortium has announced its Call for Papers for its annual conference, to be held at the National Library of New Zealand in Wellington from November 13-15, 2018. Abstracts should be 300 to 500 words in length, and may touch upon topics related to: building web archives, maintaining web archive content and operations, using and researching web archives, web archive histories and futures, and more. Proposals are due February 28, 2018. 
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